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a deal with the college democrats but those of us thought are not involved in the politics and education or finance or any other topic and a lot of people but are not in the politics don't know what to do and they believe they see the problems in front of us and they understand and comprehend how serious they are and they want to do something that they either do not know how to or they are intimidated. but from my experience they are ready to believe again and they can hope again and as our national leader continuance buyer and hope my generation the people that are older than me so once again stand out and fight for what they believe. >> it's how you teach an old dog new tricks. >> most of us are in our environment how we were raised, and we learn from them. i have said there's five promises every adult should make. the first is a child should have a loving and caring adults in their life and the second is they should have a healthy start to read the child should have an education. the child should have a safe place. the second one is a promise you cannot teach. they should grow to be l
will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
, education, and taxes. this is 45 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i am the president of the american enterprise institute and i am pleased to welcome eric cantor today. it is an important policy speech entitled making life work. now, an ordinary introduction of his political career and rise to majority leader and talk about his new legislative accomplishment, his career, as most of you know, is not a collection of accomplishment, but a long-term effort to make it better, or country for all americans. here is someone who pauses to remember the why of public policy, valuing justice for all, protecting the vulnerable, and fighting against class divisions in american life. he knows that it leads to a happy and more prosperous life for more people. he cares about those who are being left behind, people that are looking for work and cannot find it. people who raised barriers of starting business and building another life. eric cantor knows that policy analysis as an american or someone who wants to become an american, is very important. here is the reason that i admire him
'm grateful for his education and there is no comparison between the quality of this man and chuck hagel. they are in different sandboxes. i'm very grateful for people like this who we desperately need in times like this. >> we go to the independent line. this is doug, welcome to the conversation. caller: thanks for taking my call and thanks to c-span. i think the only one that had any sanity and knew the questions that were going to be asked. we did not get any answers to them. how is the decision made? what are the requirements? the independent said we should have a court that regardless who the president is they should not have a unilateral way to document nominate someone. people in this country don't know about the mddaa, the national defense thorgs act which allows the president to designate a person who he feels is a terrorist or supporting terrorist organizations to deprive him of life, liberty and not be able to go in front of a court. you can't say listen, you have the wrong person. we can be unilaterally detained. there is no question about, for instance, the propaganda guy th
research and education. cuts to military personnel and law enforcement. cuts that will cause jobs and do real harm to the american economy as it struggles to recover. and the reality is that we don't even have that much time. we only have nine legislative days left in february to address the issue. nine days to negotiate a trillion-dollar deal with the senate and the president. and instead of a meaningful plan to address the crisis that we need to avert, we have this nonsense before us today. this is no way to govern. the disturbing truth is that many republicans seem downright giddy when it comes to the sequester cuts. there is new story after new story of how we'll let the sequester take effect. the gentleman from georgia, dr. price, couldn't support these cuts fast enough. i was shocked. mr. speaker, it was only last week that the economic numbers for the fourth quarter of 2012 were released. unexpectedly we saw a contraction in those numbers, a contraction fueled by a massive reduction in defense spending. what do you know, huge cuts in government spending during a fragile economic r
happens to others. >> yes, that is true. i showed up in this country, mit was kind enough to educate me and i went on to start a public company. the existing company has thousands of employees. over a billion dollars revenue in a little over a decade. every person i employees probably 10 other people that are employed by partners at other companies. so it makes no sense to spend hundreds of thousands educating these kids and then forcing them to go back home. liz: you and i have spoken before about this. if somebody's getting a college degree here, you should stamp the green card right there upon their graduation, put it on the diploma and say stay here, we are your friend if you want to start a business. think of your own experience, think of google, you look at them and say think of how many people they now higher. yahoo was founded by immigrant kids. these are real opportunities for this nation, what are we doing wrong, what should we be doing to get it right? >> we have to make these kids will come. if you walk through the halls of any graduate program, in the engineering school, mo
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
for public education as to how you should be doing these things. if you join the nra and go to one of the 80,000 trainers you get that. there are a lot of people that aren't nra members. the public education campaign on the safety of firearms would be great. we would love to support it. >> first of all, i would like to get the signup sheet for the field trip for the gun show. [laughter] >> i'll tell you what, the next time they have the gun show, i'll have a signup sheet. if anybody wants to go i'll take them. i can't get you in for free. >> sometimes so you a little bit of an expense. [laughter] >> there's been a lot of talk about whether this is different. and it's a political question not an ideological question. do you think this time is different? and if it is, it doesn't seem that the nra has changed in any way the positions on what is acceptable or not acceptable to reflect that. i have another question. i'll let you answer that one. >> sure. i think that our opponents hope this is different in the sense they hope they can use a motion to achieve an antifirearm agenda they haven't bee
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
the fact that for example education wasn't a primary issue in the presidential debate i think is extraordinarily problematic. because i realize the focus is on the economy and jobs, but we're not going to regain our position in the global marketplace till we fix our public education. >> i hear the president talking about it as being a priority but i don't see a lot of evidence of it being a priority. >> well, it certainly wasn't in the presidential campaign. you did not hear the candidates really talking about the education policy issues. and i think that was problematic. >> what do you want to see done? putting students first sounds a great idea till you have to somehow -- you've got 120,000 schools in america. >> right. >> what are the overview bullet points you would like to see happen which could radically change america's education system to start making it more competitive? >> so there are three primary things we focus on at students first. the first is making sure there's a highly effective teacher in front of every child every single day. the second area is -- >> you g
's for education office has convened a group of constituents across the city, across public nonpublic community based organizations to come together to then develop the strategies that can help those kids get over the hurdles they are facing to be connected. >> and i guess we should point this out, mayor gray is the one who put this coalition together. let me ask you a question critics would say. data gathering alone like this really be enough to make a difference. what has to happen next. >> of course data gathering is not enough. what happens next is this data goes out to the people on the ground doing the work. the deputy mayor for education has convened not only the executive council leadership team but also then convened the change networks, the people working on the ground, running the programs and delivering the services to be able to think critically about the programs they run and best deliver services to the young people in need. >> here's one last question, another finding showed that young people between 20 and 24 early 20s and in that group in dc only 42% have full-time jobs and th
to focus more on issues like education and health care and less on the deficit. what about immigration and is just tweak be the talking points enough? we'll have a special note to self on the intern who rushed to save gabby giffords just moments after she was shot. the justice department and government action that local grewries say is a good thing. we'll be live in alexandria, virginia. lots ahead because the news is back in the morning. we'll see you at 7:00. >> we like it. thank you, norah. we'll be watching. >>> baltimore is in party mode this morning. its countdown to the ravens victory parade in honor of their sunday triumph at the super dome. >> delia goncalves live in the newsroom with more on the big celebration including joe flacco's time at the david letterman show. good morning, delia. >> reporter: good morning. flacco has been very busy. he had a great time. you mentioned he probably looked tired. absolutely because he had a whirlwind couple of days. the city will virtually shut down today for the big parade. several streets are blocked off. businesses are shutting down. p
education may not have done it without the support of the school as well as coaches and staff. >> just to get an idea of how difficult this is to accomplish this feet, less than 2% of high school football players across the country are getting scholarship offers to play division 1 football. you have 8 today. talk about the hills that these players have to over come to achieve something like that. >> it's adversity as you well know in the dc area. with these young men, the peer pressure they go through, some inequalities they have, don't spend a lot of time on that. we choose to focus on the positives, focus on the future and getting out of certain predicaments. at the end of the day we're extremely happy for our kids. like i said, the main goal is for them to achieve a college education. >> we have four guys staying here locally, playing for the university of maryland. when you look at them, talk about some of the talent and how neat is it for you to be able to watch them so close to home? >> it's awesome. we have one kid that already plays at maryland. they kind of were familiar with
for better education and schools about how to treat sports injuries. >> who is going to protect them if we don't? we're the adults. . >> reporter: she hopes her son's tragedy will keep other children safe. the trainers association counts at least 34 youth sports-related fatalities last year. it's estimated 2 million injuries occur to high school athletes each year. i'm danielle leigh, news 4. >>> a big change in the way we get our mail. they are ending saturday delivery in an effort to save $2 billion. >> it's not happening this week. the change will happen in august. but as chris claken reports, this could be disastrous. >> mail delivery will occur monday through friday and we will not deliver nor collect mail on saturday. >> it's a move the postal service has wanted to make for years, but now says is necessary to cut more than $2 billion from its already struggling budget. >> it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. >> under plan, mail will be delivered to homes and businesses monday through friday but only packages will be delivered on saturdays. while
be the key to higher education and perhaps even brilliance for a lot of folks who don't necessarily have the time or money for college. say nothing of an ivy league school. online learning is hardly new. it's been around for a long time. but open access to classes at some of this nation's most prestigious institutions is new. and people of all kinds and all ages are signing on. our report from our chief education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> reporter: the college classroom is changing. courses from some of the world's most elite universities are now available to anyone for free. at a furious pace, schools are participating with start-up companies like coursera to deliver online courses. or m.o.o.k.s. >> much faster than any of us were expecting. we reached our first 1 million users faster than facebook. >> reporter: physics, poetry, astronomy, even guitar, all just a click away. university of virginia retooled his modern history course for this semester's online debut. the class usually open to 120 students saw enrollment soar. >> 42,000 students around the world. >> reporter: to put
's behavior by members of the military and a savings plan and he finds financial education program substantially increased savings in the tsp have had no or sunpak, for example, on the amount of credit for military members have outstanding. so re-signing of crowd out there. the society by my colleague at harvard looking at denmark are much better data and they are so concerned about privacy. when they look at automatic savings programs, they found little cutout and other parts of the balance sheet either. so i think it's a legitimate concern, though most of the evidence suggests certainly it's not one-for-one offset. >> any other thoughts on the crowd out at all ms. mccarthy? >> i would offer we don't have it. the complexity it would affect the asset the pain is difficult. it's important on the automatic enrollment is a significant impact in getting participants into the plan. our enrollment rate, participation rate is 67% previous automatic enrollment 80%. it's a very powerful distinction in and of itself is so dramatic that it's hard for me to think is creating a big distraction
have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will
schools. >>> a routine assembly in the district was anything but routine for one special educator. it was a surprise awards presentation for jacqueline sims. she teaches third grade in southeast d.c. she received an educator award often called the oscar award of teaching. >> since i was little i always wanted to teach. i would take my sisters and we would playskool. i've just always wanted to teach. that's all i know. >> she credits sims with bringing innovative ideas to the classroom and focusing on the success of each and every student. it comes with a nice bonus of $25,000. she's also been invited to join a nationwide panel whose work serves as a resource for fellow educators. that passion makes the difference. >> maybe we need to follow her some more with some cameras. maybe i'll be falling you soon. >>> melissa mccarthy, the star of the cbs comedy mike and molly has a new movie tomorrow. >> she plays a con artist. bigad shaban has a preview of the newcombdy identity -- new comedy "identity theft." >> reporter: melissa mccarthy stars as the identity theft, a loud mouthed con a
like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs. and it will slow down our recovery. >> reporter: those jobs are at risk for the sequester takes effect in march. the president is asking lawmakers to find targeted short-term cuts to keep the economy moving and buy more time to craft a longer-term deal. >> our economy is headed in the right direction. it will stay that way as lodge as there aren't any more self- inflicted wounds coming out of washington. >> reporter: the senate remains deeply divided. >> the sooner we solve our spending problem, the sooner our jobs problem will go away as well. >> reporter: house republicans say they've twiced passed legislation to replace the sequester and it is time for the senate and president to do their job. >> the president's budget is late again. senate democrats haven't done a budget in nearly four years and none of them have a plan to replace the sequester. >> reporter: this comes as new data from the congressional budget office shows the deficit will be under $1 trillion for the first time in five years. republicans
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
this imbalance, congress created the children's hospital graduate medical education program. this is a program that was created and has been sustained with bipartisan support. unfortunately the program is facing elimination. president obama's budget for the 2012 fiscal year called for elimination of the program, despite the positive results. i support getting rid of programs that are duplicative, unproven or unnecessary. especially with the budget pressures we're facing now. however chgme has a proven track record. over 40% of pediatricians in the united states are trained through chgme. 43% of those in subspecialties are trained through the program. the children's hospital of philadelphia runs the largest pediatric residency in the country. the residents will treat children in my community and then move across the country to practice in other communities. we need their expertise now more than ever. last congress i worked with commy democratic counterpart on the -- my democrat counterpart to renew the program. our legislation passed the house of representatives twice in the 112th congress, bot
've never seen someone so emotional what they're testifying. a man 40 years he quit because it was education malpractice he said in the schools. >> alisyn: that that was peggy the group for americans for prosperity, a hearing in texas over the controversial school curriculum used by about three quarters of the state and we're hearing more compelling testimony from texas educators who call some of these lessons down right anti-american. let's listen what they told texas lawmakers. >> here is the lesson, to ask our american students to design a communist flag, imagine a new socialist nation is creating a flag and you've been put in charge based on radical ideas aka socialism, marxism, and indoctrinating our children with pro islam lesso lessons. >> i resigned as soon as i could find another job, i felt i was abetting a crime of civil rights and human rights. and teaching was like a surgeon forced to use filthy scalpels, as long as i cooperated i was guilty of malpractice. before i'd been a slave i'd be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be -- (applause) >> well, republicans from te
blocked loans from the interamerican development foundation of $146 million loans for education, water and things like that. the international republican institute arranged and organized the opposition to it and then we as a country trained rebel soldiers in the dominican republic, trained and armed them to come to haiti to overthrow the government and then the last analysis, those were a pulse didn't figure into it. bush carried out the coup himself on american soldiers who arrived at the home of the president and took him off at 3:00 in the morning to the central african republic. we have to had to go there. maxine waters, a jamaican parliamentarian and sharon webster and the president's lawyer flew off to rescue him to bring him back to jamaica and then condoleezza rice threatened to make the jamaican government -- threatened to make it very difficult for them if jamaica accepted aristide even for a matter of days before he went to south africa. all because he said the minimum income ought to be raced from 1 dollar a day to $2 a day. the sweatshops of essentially white in haiti comb
-time work since. college-educated, 20 years of experience. i live in san francisco in an area where did score -- where discrimination based on age is encouraged. discrimination based on race is encouraged as well. it is a shame. my senators, basically if you are not from a protected class, you do not exist. these people -- i saved up a lot of money over my life and had planned on retiring at 65, like everyone else, but i spent a lot of my retirement just trying to survive, which is a shame. host: was your retirement 401k? personal savings? how did it break down? caller: it was a mix. host:-, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. -- ash, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. caller: all of a sudden everything fell apart several years ago. i could have retired, but i saw the writing on the wall, businesses started falling down and everyone who has a retirement, god bless you, but it is so hard. i feel bad for the grandchildren who they all say are not going to make it. it is terrible, this country has put a hole in front of everything else. they have got to quit doin
to education and innovation and things we're actually going to need. and might sound like a good idea, let's just do it. we deserve it cause it took us so long to get to this point. >> well, you would if the federal government had a role in some of these things. let's talk about education. education is funded on a local level. you are not going to hurt education. energy is produced by mostly by the private sector. only time isn't is when the federal government gives places like solyndra. i don't know you hurt anything by hurting education or by energy. i frankly think what you are going to see right now is a lot of republican wills and even democrats say let's stop all this craziness and sit down and come up with a plan. they had a plan two years ago. the president's bipartisan commission came up with a deficit reduction plan. i think we're back to ground zero again. but it doesn't feel like it this time. i don't know why. i think frankly it's going to happen. >> got about five seconds. final words. >> more government in business than you like to admit. >> we will see. unfortunately it's
are things that the bureau wants to hold back, so that we don't inadvertently educate other would be hostage takers or terrorists. it's fair to say the camera did get in there. that allowed them to gather the intelligence they needed. and probably determine the exacts moment when it would be safest to detonate that diversionary device, breech the door, make the entry and so forth. it wasn't just a guess. i think it was well planned. there has been reports that the hrt, the hostage rescue team built a mock bunker based on how they knew about the layout to practice the rescue and so forth. i think that's probably what occurred. >> jimmy lee dykes, the suspect in this case, who is now dead, is a survivalist with anti-government sentiment. anti-government sentiment in this country is at an all time high. will we see more of this kind of thing? >> well, it's hard to say. unfortunately, situations like this sometimes result in copy cat events. people who are unstable, who are on the edge, look at a situation like this and think it's a good thing to do. hopefully, they will look at this and see thi
in government, why they are good policies, good principals, to help people. i talked a lot today about education, about empowering parents to make choices so we can save kids who we're going to lose from nonperforming schools. i talked about how we've got working families struggling to get through the month. how do we help them? we help by growing an economy. we help them by giving them the tools to go about their daily life, to manage their affairs, to reduce healthcare costs, to remove some of the costly taxes coming from obamacare on healthcare. there are a lot of things we can do to help families and that's what i talked about today. really making life work again for so many millions of americans who need relief. >> many republicans say the party has a serious messaging problem. your ideas may be right but you can't get the message through. listen to bobby jindal on the 25th of january. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. i'm serious, it's time for a new republican party that talks like adults. >> so many republicans say you're getting the stuffing beaten out of you on messaging fro
in new york city, the nation's largest public school operation, educators have softened the discipline code. so now students can curse at their teachers and simply get a reprimand. no suspension, just a little scolding. new york city education spokeswoman margie feinberg said new rules will keep the kids who commit low level infractions in class where they can learn from their mistakes. yeah. sure. as a former teacher, i know if the system allows students to curse out teachers in front of all students, all discipline breaks down. by the way, that's one of the reasons i said -- send my kids to catholic school in new york state. disrespect is everywhere. on the net, troubled people say the most horrendous things hiding behind their machines. on television reality program off the chart irresponsible. shows like jersey shore and this idiot thing in west virginia debase our culture all day long. the miami judge may have overreacted a bit, but he should be applauded. america has got to get back to basics. if we don't respect each other, we are headed for big trouble. i believe we are headed
-day-old gates they could be grated from a to f. it's pardon of the governor's education reform bit. points fear that the grating system would sippingle out the struggles schools unfairly. in prince george's county, they're clarifies the new controversyial policy on who gets to own the rights to work, artwork done by students and staff. the head of the county board of education says the proposal was designed to protect the work created on school equipment by staff and teachers, not to grant ownership rights of paintings and other work made by students. parents have expressed concerns. >> it's not an inflammatory situation. we certainly did not mean for it to be. we want create activity and we see this as a way to encourage it. >> it's not clear when the reworked policy will be introduced. >> well, it was electric, everybody is still talking about the super bowl halftime performance, but beyonce is already looking forward to her next big appearance right here in washington. >>> plus a young teenager who took on the taliban proves that she is not backing down. we'll be right back. >>> the courageo
schoolteacher is getting a national educator award worth $25,000. the surprise announcement happened this morn at ann beers elementary school. megan mcgrath was there and joins us live to tell us what happened. tell us a it. >> it was a big surprise, barbara. you can see the sign behind me, ann be anne beers elementary school, home of the cheetahs. now it's home to one of the best teachers in the country. it was billed as a celebration of school achievement. but when philanthropist took the microphone it soon became obvious that something special was afoot. >> how much is this now? >> reporter: with help of the students he used flash card to write out the number $25,000. then came the big surprise. the third grade teacher, jacqueline simms, was getting a check for that amount, $25,000. she had no idea. >> oh, my gosh. i'm completely surprised. completely surprised. i'm in awe. i never would have imagined that i would have been receiving this award today. >> reporter: jacqueline simms is the winner of the milken educator award, an honor given to teachers who ro moat excellence in schools and ha
had a heart attack. and it was really an unfortunate time for me because i just wasn't educated. i had never taken the time to learn about the signs of a heart attack or, you know, about women and their risks for heart disease. >> when it was happening, did you know that's what it was? >> i did not. i was pregnant at the time. i mistook the signs for morning sickness. >> let me ask you, there's a lot of women watching right now. what are the signs? who is at risk? >> you know, both men and women do get chest pain, but women in particular have symptoms other than chest pain. they have shortness of breath, heartburn. like she did. and dizziness, fatigue. so oftentimes women delay seeking help because they think it's something else. and the message here is that heart disease is preventable. and so it's a message for all women today, get to know your cardiac risk factors so you can try to prevent heart disease. >> lastly, do you have a final word or advice you'd like to share with the ladies watching today? >> yes. heart disease does not care what size you wear. it doesn't care how o
want to point out, which will be live it 10:00 a.m. on c-span3 is education secretary arne duncan talking about waivers for the "no child left behind" bill. on c- like a 10:00 a.m. span3. robert is on our republican line for seamless. should sequestration be allowed to go through? caller: hi. we were calling it the fiscal cliff. all the sudden it seems we have gone away from that and we are calling it sequestration. i thought that the whole term "fiscal cliff" came about because sequestration was part of that. the media keeps differentiating that now. host: you don't see a difference? caller: it is still sequestration, that is the fiscal cliff. that has not gone away. host: semantics aside, what would you like to see done? caller: just for the media to clarify we never really got anywhere except for slight increase in taxes on a small number of people. it was $450 million and above. how many people actually dropped checks of? ? host: $450 million? caller: $450,000. excuse me. i don't know anybody that's actually gets a check of that amount, or maybe a bonus. i don't know. nonethel
of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school. the "washington post" reports the county board of education will be given recommendations today that include requiring every person entering a county school to show i.d. the schools will also hold two large-scale drills each year including a lockdown drill next month and an active shooter drill in april. >>> and a man is undergoing a menial evaluation this morning for trespassing in an anne arundel county school. 25-year-old justin beaumont is accuse of walking into north county high school in glen burnie, telling people he was bullied when he was a student there more than a decade ago. officers arrested him. when they searched his home, they found several weapons. police say the guns are legal. and beaumont was not armed when he was inside the school. >>> today, it is defense secretary leon panetta's turn to answer questions about september's deadly attack in benghazi, libya. he and the chairman of the joint chiefs will testify before the senate armed services committee. they will discuss the results of the defense department's internal revie
. 9,000 miles high. they could foot the country's education bill for two years. they could give every apple employee a $1.7 million bonus. or better yet, give every american a check for $437. >>> back to the real world where hewlett-packard is following in apple's footsteps and posing new limits on the students and temporary workers in their china factory. >>> and bank of america got in on this, winter storm. >>> and the blue brew is bringing it back to the singer aisle with justin timber lack. >>> and if david beckham hasn't claimed he did all the stunts for his new h & m underwear commercial, we wouldn't have to show it to you. but he did say he liked getting to do all the stunts. he said bloggers have been poring over the 30-second spot. and the verdict is becs did include use a body double. >>> check this out. a two-lane plow. plus, no snowstorm can stop the madness of the most pampered and primped pooches on the planet. the dog show comes to new york. you're watching "early today." >>> welcome back. >>> now to some other stories that caught our eye this morning. we start in flori
of switch gears on messaging. he is expected to tout new education initiatives, ways to simplify the tax code, kush health care costs, immigration reform. ron fournier with the "national journal," jonathan, asked this question -- "with a democratic tide threatening to crush the dpop, is it enough to just tweak talking points?" what do you say to that question? >> i think there's a tendency among policy maker, politicians who are in the legislative chamber all day, to be using this policy. they talk about the fiscal cliff, about entitlement reform, about debalancing the budget. but it's devoid of any value to the average voter. so fournier may have a point there, but i think it's critical for republicans to be talking about the values behind these policies, that we're always promoting. fiscal responsibility, why are we doing that? because that's a path to prosperity. i think that's a critical thing that eric cantor is doing today and i applaud him for doing it. >> that is what he does seem to be wanting to talk about, connecting the dots. and steve, he isn't just talking about -- you know
a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscie
. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy should be put in jeopardy because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes or government programs we agree need some reform. >> republicans are criticizing the president for failing to submit his budget proposal to congress before the government deadline, which is the first monday of february. he's missed the deadline four times in five years. >> we could learn more about the proceedings of the man accused of killing chandra levy. they will hold a hearing today to discuss reporters' requests about closed proceedings. we aren't sure what the hearings were about. guandique a may have the conviction overturned because a key witness in the trial is not credible. >>> in the child sex abuse charge against him, lawyers for rick curl filed document for an agreement but no deal until the incompetent pear work is signed. a document says a girl was sexually abused starting at 13 years old. he cou
for affordable education. good morning, lauren. >> hi there, good morning. i'm a little nervous watching these automatic spendings. >> the market is getting a little bit jittery and that's why have a mixed market. no major movement. we're looking at gains this morning, investigators after the huge january are waiting for the sequester that could start on march 1st. with i get something today that could be moving, shake them up a little bit. rei tail sales at macy's and target. >> let's talk about the next story that is pretty i nteresting. some states are taking an interesting approach to making college more affordable and this is ground-breaking. >> it's an idea and it's a challenge of making college a bachelor's degree of $10,000. this is attractive to students and families facing this high cost of education if you look at the past 25 years. there's no guaranty that the bachelor's the -- degree is going to get you a job when you graduate. we have governor's in texas, wisconsin saying we're going to do this. -- lawmakers are considering the measure. hopefully more states sign up. >> ab
make lessons more personalized. u.s. secretary of education arne duncan says it it skids more focused on learning. >> it can open up a world of possibilities. >> there are roadblocks like budget constraints. digital learning is a welcome change. >> i think schools should evolve with the rest of the world. >> there is an effort to encourage all schools to pursue digital learning in the next 24 months. we will keep you posted on the progress of that program. what's coming up next a cutting edge surgery for newborns. life-saving surgery for a little girl who weighed just 7 pounds. we're sitting on a bunch of shale gas. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ ♪ we gotta sell the car. where would we even sta
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